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This photo shows RMWD Aura before her health deteriorated. She is modeling with a FIFTY/FIFTY water bottle, etched with MWDTSA's logo.

This photo shows RMWD Aura before her health deteriorated. She is modeling with a FIFTY/FIFTY water bottle, etched with MWDTSA's logo.RMWD Aura N679 was one of us—a MWDTSA volunteer. She and her humans represented MWDTSA at educational events, a movie premiere, and more. So, her death on February 7, 2020, touched us all. Below are two tributes: the first by her mom Jesca Daniels and the second by Kayla Miller of Negative Image Photography, LLC. RMWD Aura N679, thank you for your service to our nation and to MWDTSA. Rest easy.

From Jesca Daniels

We just said goodbye to Aura and our hearts are broken.

Most of you know that Mark was Aura’s first and only handler in the Marine Corps. She came into our life in 2010. Mark had been a handler for six years at the time, but she was his first Malinois. And boy was she everything a Malinois should be—smart, energetic, loyal, energetic, determined, energetic…did I mention energetic?

She gave him a run for his money, but in the end she made him a better handler. They were a beautiful team to see in action. I first fell in love with her love for him. Little did I know I would go on to fall in love with her love for the girls and me.

An IED blast creates a new family

In 2013, they deployed to Afghanistan. Three months in, I got the call that both of them and six other Marines had been injured in an IED blast. I didn’t know it then, but we gained seven family members that day. I am forever grateful that they all survived, and I love each and every one of them.

Mark rehabilitated and eventually went back to full duty. After months of rehabilitating MWD Aura in-country, she and Mark reunited. In that moment, I knew that one day she would be ours. She already was. A few months later, Aura tore her cruciate ligament and had to have surgery to correct it. After the first surgery, she would go on to tear the other and require more procedures. This ultimately lead to her retirement. It was final; she was coming home.

This photo shows RMWD Aura's military vest, which includes a Guardians of the Night patch.

RMWD Aura sports her tactical vest harness with “Retired Guardians of the Night” patch. (Photo by Kayla Miller, Negative Image Photography, LLC)

On May 22, 2015, Aura came home to the girls and me while Mark was serving a year in Japan. I remember being so nervous about how she was going to do without him that I visited her at the kennels every week until it was time for her to come home.

I recall the exact moment she became my dog. I don’t say that to take away from the bond that she and Mark shared. I just mean that by the time she came home, I did not feel like I was taking care of his dog. She was part of the family. RMWD Aura put all of her heart into loving the girls and me, just as she had into loving and protecting her Dad. You guys know what happened next because you have loved us enough to follow her journey these past few years.

Beginning of the end

A little over a year ago, Aura started to not act like herself. It began with licking to a point she would lose control of her bladder, and being a bit off balance. As she progressed, she became unable to open her mouth very well to eat. RMWD Aura lost muscle tone all over her body and eventually was unable to get up or lay down without assistance. She would fall when she walked, and she genuinely seemed frightened of the world around her.

My spunky, energetic Velcro dog got to the point where instead of following me to every room, she would lift her head and sigh, but remain where she was. She lost interest in her KONG, which if you were lucky enough to have met her, you know was a big deal.

It got to the point where we were no longer looking for signs that it was time to let go, but rather we were trying to find a reason not to. After consulting several vets and specialists—and given her diagnoses—we knew that it was time to make the hard choice. RMWD Aura had MMM, DM, masses on her adrenal glands and spleen, and her quality of life was just not there.

The best last day

So, on February 7, 2020, we set out to give her the best last day ever. She had pizza, a donut, and Starbucks, her favorite things, and she got love from all of her people. As hard as it was, it was the best day she has had in a while. I think she knew we were going to let her be at peace.

With her family's help, RMWD Aura consumes one last Starbuck's Puppuccino.

RMWD Aura enjoys a final Starbuck’s Puppuccino. (Photo by Kayla Miller, Negative Image Photography, LLC)

She had a bit of her twinkle back, and I think, I hope, she felt covered with love. In the end, we decided we would all be with her. The girls didn’t want to be in the waiting area. They wanted RMWD Aura to know that we were all there, so we were. We all told her how much she was loved, and we held her and loved her until the end. It was one of the hardest moments of all of our lives, but it is a moment I am glad we all shared. We all got that closure, and she had us all there.

This heart-wrenching image shows Mark Daniels giving RMWD Aura a final embrace.

Family members embrace RMWD Aura in her final hour. (Photo by Kayla Miller, Negative Image Photography, LLC)

For the full album, showing RMWD Aura’s best last day, visit: https://www.facebook.com/AuraN679/

Gratitude

There are so many people we need to thank. First and foremost, Mission K9 Rescue. They provided vet care for Aura through all of this. And more than that, they have been a rock in our life as far as friendship and support. If it weren’t for them, we would not have had the time with her we did. Thank you from the bottom of my heart.

And Negative Image Photography, LLC, for capturing the final moments for us. I honestly didn’t think I wanted pictures, but now I am so grateful that we have them. We will absolutely cherish them forever. Thank you for making yourself available and for being a part of her last day. I know it couldn’t have been easy on you and I will never be able to thank you enough for the gift you gave us.

Military Working Dog Team Support Association, Inc. and Rocky Mountain Dawgs Project: you guys have literally become our family. Our lives are better because you are in them. And to everyone who has loved us, followed us, cheered for us, and cried with us, we are truly grateful for your presence in our life.

And finally, Aura, thank you for being my best friend. Thank you for always loving me and the girls no matter what we went through. Thank you for healing parts of me I didn’t even know were broken. You were the best girl and I hope that we brought you half the joy you gave to us. I love you forever and I will count every star until I see you again… Goodbye Love.

 

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From Kayla Miller

As a photographer, I’m often hired to capture some of the happiest moments in people’s lives. Weddings, births, families playing… you know, LOVE in its happiest form. I’ve never been hired to capture love in its saddest form, until today.

Meet Aura, a retired United States Marine MWD. Aura and her handler (daddy) Mark met in 2010. They instantly shared a bond that all the instructors said was incredible, one of the best teams to ever come through their training.

A bond that heals

In March 2013, they were stationed in Afghanistan together. One day on their way back from patrol, they were both injured in an IED blast. Mark and Aura were thrown from their seats. He sustained a TBI with bleeding and bruising on the brain, along with back and neck injuries. Aura sustained a collapsed lung and heart arrhythmia. She was very anxious and couldn’t sleep.

They took her to the hospital to see Mark before he was flown stateside for medical care. When she saw he was ok, she climbed in his bed and slept for the first time since the accident. Aura had to stay in Afghanistan for treatment until they could have someone fly her back.

Mark’s wife says that finally being able to see Aura again motivated him through his rehabilitation. After he recovered, Mark went on to receive The Purple Heart medal. In 2015, Aura retired and went to live out the rest, best days, of her life with Mark and his family. Most of that time was just with Mark’s wife and daughters as he was deployed again.

They joined in on the bond and loved Aura so deeply. She was loved to the fullest and catered to until the very end. She had the best, last day a US Marine could ever dream of.

Reflections on RMWD Aura N679

Thank you isn’t enough to express my gratitude for your service. RIP Aura N679—End of Watch 2/7/2020.

This has been by far the hardest project I have ever taken on. I can’t say I did it with a smile on my face the whole time because that’s not true. While I did greet Aura and her family with smiles and warm wishes, I am still human and have emotions. It took everything I had in me to stay strong and not break down with them. I wasn’t strong enough and did in fact quietly break down. I become invested in the people whose lives I capture, fully invested. No matter the form of love I capture, just know I feel it, too.

As civilians, we have no idea what our soldiers go through to protect our country, so we can go where we want, when we want…so we can post on Facebook, have the jobs we want and have the things we want. Our soldiers sometimes aren’t always people. They are animals. Willing, able and brave enough to go where man cannot.

God Bless ALL of our soldiers.

This photo shows a retired military working dog who attended a Petco Foundation Helping Heroes fundraising event.

The Petco Foundation is investing $5,000 in MWDTSA’s care package program! This grant will help purchase supplies that can be hard to find in a combat environment. We send items such as thermometers, paw protection, grooming products, and collapsible water bowls to enhance safety and comfort for our four-legged troops. Many of the teams we support serve in remote areas and harsh climates. They regularly tell us they value the supplies we send each quarter.

Since its founding in 2006, MWDTSA has sent over a million dollars of care packages to deployed MWD teams. “These packages are the only piece of mail that some MWD teams will receive during a combat deployment. This grant from the Petco Foundation is an integral part of our quarterly care package program. We are grateful for the steadfast generosity of the Petco Foundation and their supporters,” said Nikki Rohrig, MWDTSA’s President.

The Petco Foundation’s annual Helping Heroes campaign funded the MWDTSA grant. The campaign, which takes place each October in Petco locations nationwide, supports the life-changing work of service, therapy and working animals.

For more information about MWDTSA, visit https://www.mwdtsa.org/. For more on the Petco Foundation, visit petcofoundation.org and join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram by using the hashtag #HelpingHeroes.

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About Military Working Dog Team Support Association, Inc.

A national, all-volunteer 501(c)(3) nonprofit, MWDTSA supports Military Working Dog teams in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, and Coast Guard. Each team consists of a dog and a handler, and their mission is force protection—explosives detection, tracking, patrolling, specialized search, and drug detection. They put their own lives at risk to save the lives of other soldiers and civilians every day. To learn more about how you can help MWDTSA support both ends of the leash, contact president@mwdtsa.org or visit https://www.mwdtsa.org/.

About the Petco Foundation

At the Petco Foundation, we believe that every animal deserves to live its best life. Since 1999, we’ve invested more than $260 million in lifesaving animal welfare work to make that happen. With our more than 4,000 animal welfare partners, we inspire and empower communities to make a difference by investing in adoption and medical care programs, spay and neuter services, pet cancer research, service and therapy animals, and numerous other lifesaving initiatives. Through our Think Adoption First program, we partner with Petco stores and animal welfare organizations across the country to increase pet adoptions. So far, we’ve helped more than 6 million pets find their new loving families, and we’re just getting started. Visit petcofoundation.org to learn more about how you can get involved.

 

Four elementary school students collaborate on researching a military working dog as part of a 3rd- and 4th-grade lesson plan.

Looking for a military-related lesson plan to spice up social studies?

MWDTSA volunteer Wendy Sotos is studying to become a Certified Humane Education Specialist. As part of her coursework, she has developed a lesson plan about military working dogs for 3rd and 4th graders. It’s free, and any interested teacher or home-school parent can download it below.

Lesson plan overview

The curriculum entails reading, writing, group work, a creative project, and public speaking focused on the meanings of “hero” and “memorial.” Students will hone critical thinking skills as they learn about the roles of dogs in the military. It’s also a creative way to observe National K9 Veteran’s Day, Memorial Day, or Veteran’s Day.

 

Click image above to download full curriculum.

 

About the author

A freelance writer and published author, Wendy loves animals. Over the years, she’s served with Labrador Life Line and Nikela (which saves African wildlife, including rhinos). MWDTSA is excited to share her passion for dogs and education.

When asked what led her to create this lesson plan, Wendy replied, “I have always loved learning about war dogs from history. Their contributions have been underplayed, if acknowledged at all. A way to remedy this is to teach future generations of children about the sacrifices of these heroic animals. I want to help kids learn about these dogs who fought for our country. I hope to create appreciation for military working dogs and their human counterparts who protect our freedom.”

As you utilize Wendy’s curriculum, please share your experiences and stories in the Comments section below. What insights did you and your students gain via the activities in this lesson plan? We welcome your suggestions for enhancing the curriculum.

Wendy’s next project is a service learning plan for 5th and 6th grade students, focused on military working dog teams. Stay tuned!

For information on how you can support these intrepid teams, visit https://www.mwdtsa.org/support-military-working-dog-teams/ or write to president@mwdtsa.org.

Photo credit: iStock by Getty Images/Wavebreakmedia

Photo: Active duty and Vietnam veteran dog handlers stand before the Georgia State Capital in 2007, a few weeks after Dixie Whitman and Ken Besecker founded MWDTSA. That day, Georgia Governor Sonny Perdue signed MWDTSA’s request proclaiming March 22, 2007 as Military Dog Handler Day in Georgia.

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Military Working Dog Team Support Association, Inc. (MWDTSA) began as a labor of love, co-founded by German Shepherd Dog enthusiast Dixie Whitman and Vietnam veteran dog handler Ken Besecker. Here’s a glimpse of how it all started.

Meet Ken Besecker…

“The relationship between dog and man is an unbreakable bond,” says Ken Besecker, who experienced this truism firsthand in Vietnam.

During the Vietnam War, the military classified K9s as equipment, not soldiers. But as Besecker and other veterans can attest, the estimated 4,200 military working dogs in Vietnam provided a variety of military skills. They tracked, scouted, and protected. They offered companionship, and occasionally, much-needed comic relief during this dark period of history.

Ken Besecker fell into the MWD world by happenstance. While attending the Infantry Officer Basic Course at Fort Benning, Georgia, a Captain from the U.S. Army Scout Dog Training Detachment asked if Ken would be interested in working with dogs. Ken’s affirmative response led to an assignment with the Scout Dog Detachment. Ultimately, he served in Vietnam as Commander of the 62nd Infantry Platoon (Combat Tracker) and Training Officer at the United States Army Republic of Vietnam (USARV) Dog Training Detachment.

MWD handlers and their comrades entrusted their lives to K9s in Vietnam. “The dogs endured heat, rain, leeches, jungle vines, elephant grass, and many other discomforts,” reports Besecker, “just to hear ‘good dog’ and receive a pat on the side or a scratch on the head.”

They acted heroically, like the humans they protected.

“Vietnam veterans tell of dogs lying beside their wounded buddies or continuing to track or scout or guard in the face of any danger,” adds Besecker.

In response to one particular mission, the military awarded an entire 62nd Tracker team a Bronze Star with a “V” for valor, citing heroism in combat. Since Otis, Tracker Dog number T019, did not have a uniform, the Division Assistant Commander pinned the Bronze Star on a yellow towel. This way, Otis could wear his award, too. Otis, by the way, was one of the few dogs to come home after the war.

Toward the end of the U.S. involvement in Vietnam, Ken Besecker traveled all over the country to pick dogs to return to the U.S. for reassignment. “It felt great to watch those first 50 dogs leave on planes for the U.S.,” he recalls. “It wasn’t until after the war that I learned most MWDs in Vietnam were declared ‘surplus,’ as if they were unneeded equipment, and left behind to face euthanasia or worse.” Only 204 returned to the U.S.

Besecker wants to ensure the memory of these MWDs stays alive and that people know the important roles these K9 heroes served in Vietnam and continue to serve in conflicts today, protecting countless lives.

Enter Dixie Whitman…

Dixie has studied German Shepherd Dogs for 46 years, fascinated in particular by their tracking skills—the ability to follow an invisible trail and pick up scents left hours or days ago. The first web site she ever visited? The Vietnam Dog Handlers Association (VDHA), a group of veterans from the Vietnam War. The site contained a Q&A feature, so Dixie started asking questions.

Ken Besecker was one of several Vietnam veterans who answered those queries. He shared about the Vietnam dogs and their handlers. He described the tragic end many of these MWDs faced and the shameful welcome Vietnam veterans received upon their return home.

Dixie recalls, “It became clear to me that many of these veterans had never heard a simple thank you for their service.” She set out to rectify this.

Through the VDHA dialogue, Dixie discovered that Ken lived less than 200 miles away. In 2002, she invited several Georgia-based Vietnam handlers to the Georgia Governor’s office. That’s where she met Ken and his wife Liz, face-to-face, for the first time. Dixie and Ken discovered they knew many people in common, as both were involved in the sport of dogs in Georgia.

Over the next four years, Dixie spent her own time and money sending care packages to deployed handlers and their dogs. Additionally, she helped organize events at Fort Benning. In 2006, Ken suggested establishing a nonprofit organization to facilitate fundraising and reduce Dixie’s out-of-pocket expenditures.

“I wasn’t thrilled with the idea,” Dixie said, “because I had no idea how to run a nonprofit.  But Ken and I met at a reunion of his unit, the 62nd Combat Trackers, and discussed everything from a code of ethics to articles of incorporation. He fronted the money to hire an attorney to review our paperwork. And at last, we got Lois Lerner’s signature on a 501(c)(3) letter.” The Military Working Dog Team Support Association officially launched on November 13, 2006.

Reflecting on the early years

In preparation for its 10th anniversary in 2016, MWDTSA invited co-founders Ken Besecker and Dixie Whitman to reminisce about the organization’s humble beginnings.  The following interview and the historical background above originally appeared in the November 2016 issue of Kennel Talk.

MWDTSA: What were some of the challenges in getting MWDTSA off the ground?

KEN BESECKER: We didn’t have any money or previous nonprofit experience. The nonprofit designation was vital for making fundraising easier, but it took some time to get that engine started.

DIXIE WHITMAN:  Because we had no initial funding, we still did much of the MWDTSA work on our own dimes. Also, we were (and are!) a niche group, meaning we must focus on public education since many people don’t know about MWDs.  Folks don’t realize how impactful these dog teams are, and therefore we are not “top-of-mind” when people are making charitable donations or volunteering—until you get to know us.

We started with a tiny volunteer crew—maybe two or three people on a great day.  You know the old adage, “busier than a one-armed wallpaper hanger?”  I gathered experience in everything from writing press releases, to volunteer coordination, to publishing a newsletter, and pretty much every skill in between.

MWDTSA: What was MWDTSA’s first project or event? How did you feel when you were launching that first event?

KEN: Top Dogs Pet Boutique, a pet store in Kennesaw, Georgia, hosted an open house for MWDTSA and donated a percentage of the day’s proceeds to our organization. That gave us a spring board and felt like a stamp of legitimacy.

DIXIE:  We received the final IRS letter confirming our nonprofit status shortly before a 2007 Fort Benning event that I was helping coordinate. Two hundred people attended that program, where we enjoyed a stunning guest speaker from the Pentagon. I was thrilled that we had enough money to buy a gorgeous standing floral tribute for the event.

MWDTSA: Think back over the entire history of your efforts. What MWDTSA events particularly moved you?

KEN: Dixie had a friend who taught elementary school students. Her class colored pictures and gave those out at a reunion of the 62nd Combat Tracker platoon. It really inspired me to see people caring about what had happened in the past.

MWDTSA was also able to raise money for new pedestals at the War Dog Memorial in Fort Benning. A number of veterans and volunteers attended the dedication of these pedestals, and this sticks with me as a highlight.

Additionally, for several years, there was an annual event where selected dog teams from Georgia installations visited the state capitol. The governor signed a proclamation for Military Working Dog Appreciation Day. We had the proclamation framed, presented it to the various installations, and had a cookout and dog demonstration.

“It’s been great to see the enthusiasm and bearing of today’s soldiers, Navy folks, airmen, and Marines.” —Ken Besecker

DIXIE: For me, there are a multitude of moments that stand out. I’ve been overcome by emotion on many occasions as I think about where I’ve come from and what this organization has gifted me.

One day, very early on, I was trying to send out a press release. It was my very first news release, and I had little idea of what I was doing. I wanted to get it to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and wasn’t quite sure how to go about contacting them.

The same day I wrote this press release, our Vice President, Ann Wilkerson, called to say she had just run into the wife of the military affairs writer for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution while visiting a new hair dresser. The chances of her running into the exact connection that I needed out of 4.67 million folks in Greater Atlanta were pretty slim. The press release and that connection were a real success for the MWD program at Fort Benning.

“Even today, when I think back on it, I sometimes have to pull my car over, as it is still very emotional to me.” —Dixie Whitman

Last year, I attended a memorial for a Marine dog we had supported on his deployment in Afghanistan. At that event, all three of this dog’s handlers were in attendance and shared personal stories with me of their time working with him. I felt beyond honored to have been included in the sharing of such precious and personal memories. This experience culminated in one of my favorite Kennel Talk articles ever.  If you haven’t read it, check out the cover of the August 2015 issue.

All of the handlers mean a lot to me. Some of them become really close friends, and I love that they ask me to support their friends as well. I am humbled at the quality and caliber of men and women who work with these dogs, day in and day out, to keep us all safe. Knowing that I’ve made a difference in the lives of these extraordinary heroes who have been in harm’s way is beyond special. I am honored to call so many of them friends.

This photo shows MA2 Devon Johnson and his military working dog, MWD Kalo, posing in front of a U.S. flag. This sailor and his dog save lives.

Recently, an email appeared in MWDTSA’s inbox entitled, “This Sailor and His Dog Save Lives.” It turned out to be an article by longtime MWDTSA donor Duke Cannon about a care package recipient! With Duke Cannon’s permission, we are reprinting the full interview below. We are grateful for their unwavering support of MWDTSA’s mission to support both ends of the leash. Please check out their amazing products!

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If you’re familiar with Duke Cannon, you know we have a special place in our hearts for those who serve our country. And we have an even bigger place in our hearts for dogs. So imagine how we feel about dogs who serve our country. (If we used emojis, it would be the face with hearts for eyes.)
 
This month, our Good Folks Project pays tribute to two heroes with a total of six legs: Sailer MA2 Devon Johnson and his military working dog, MWD Kalo. The duo travels worldwide to sniff out threats in order to keep our bases and embassies safe. In their downtime, they boost soldier morale with a heavy dose of tail wags. We are grateful for the hard work Devon and Kalo dedicate to their country, and we’re honored to share their story.

A NO-BS INTERVIEW WITH DEVON JOHNSON

 

 

 

How did you get involved with Military Dog Handling?

When I was first joining the Navy, I got taken by my recruiter to Naval Air Station Whidbey Island to see what my future job as a Master-At-Arms would be. It was a lot of law enforcement and gate duty until I met the handlers and fell in love. I did everything I could to get selected for it in our training school, but with no luck. So, my next choice was to volunteer at the Kennels in Bahrain. I would come in on my off time as Kennel Support helping the real handlers do their job and learning from a great group of people. From there I ended up getting a letter of recommendation from the Kennel Master, and leaving Bahrain with Military Working Dog Handler orders to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

What does a normal day look like for Kalo and you?

A normal work day for us always starts out with giving him breakfast, then grooming him to make sure he’s ready for the day. After that we start our day with obedience work in explosive detection training and end our day in some kind of patrol A.K.A. “bite work”. We can and do get calls throughout the day for vehicle searches or searches of unattended bags, as we are the base’s narcotics and explosive experts.

How does Kalo help fellow soldiers, even on the toughest days?

The biggest benefit I saw was during our time in Kuwait with the National Guard. For most of the soldiers, it was their first time away from home, let alone time in the Middle East. So we allowed them to come in, get in the bite suits, pet the dogs, and show them what we do daily. It was an amazing experience to see their faces brighten up when they see dogs, especially since most people think they’re overly aggressive – but they’re just big ol’ teddy bears.

They say a dog is a man’s best friend – is this true for you and Kalo?

Oh yes it is! I love that dog as if he were my son and he made days when it was hard for me 100x better. You spend everyday with him, talk to him, workout with him, and even eat with him so you build this bond that you will never build with anyone else. We have our days when we fight – like when I just got to one of the borders for a mission and he decided he wanted to take all my clean clothes out of my bag to lay in instead of lay on his or my bed, so I didn’t have any clean clothes for a week.

Which Duke Cannon products are essential for your daily hygiene on base? Which is Kalo’s favorite scent?

The biggest must have is the Cold Shower Cooling Field Towels. I love these things to death, especially traveling between countries or when you are on duty/somewhere it’s hard to get a shower. You guys supply them to MWDTSA and we get them in care packages which help out so much. I’ll have to say Kalo’s favorite scent besides explosives is Naval Supremacy because we are U.S Navy Sailors for life. 


The Duke Cannon Good Folks Project aims to highlight hard working men and women and pups making a positive impact on their community and country.

To emphasize the need to prevent dog heat stroke, this graphic demonstrates how quickly a car heats up inside at various outside temperatures.

Military working dog handlers will tell you their greatest K9 first aid priority is to prevent dog heatstroke. On this first day of summer, MWDTSA is honored to share the following safety information from Colorado State University’s James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital, reprinted with permission of the author.

by Kristen Browning-Blas

Never leave a dog in a vehicle in the sun, even if the temperature is mild and the windows are open. In a matter of minutes, a K9 can become overheated while exercising, playing or just by being left in the heat with no water or shade. Heat exhaustion can quickly become a life-threatening heatstroke, which can cause organ failure and death.

Always provide access to fresh water and shade – especially in the heat of the day.

Obesity and pre-existing medical conditions put pets at much higher risk of heat exhaustion and heatstroke. Puppies, elderly dogs, and dogs with dark-colored or long-haired coats are more at risk, and flat-faced breeds, including bulldogs and pugs, are more susceptible to overheating.

If you are concerned about a pet (or person) that is locked in a hot car, contact your local law enforcement. The Colorado legislature passed a law in 2017 that provides immunity from prosecution for civilians who break into a locked vehicle to rescue a dog, cat, or at-risk person.

​Signs of heat exhaustion

  • Restlessness and agitation
  • Heavy panting and rapid breathing
  • Excessive drooling that then turns to thick tenacious saliva
  • Bright red gums and tongue
  • Dry tacky gums and mucous membranes
  • Weakness or struggling to maintain balance
  • Vomiting or diarrhea
  • Body temperature of 104 degrees or greater
  • Elevated heart rate (tachycardia)
  • Confusion or disorientation

Signs of dog heatstroke

  • White or blue gums
  • Labored, noisy breathing
  • Frantic panting or wheezing
  • Rapid heart rate and drooling
  • Uncontrollable urination and or defecation
  • Vomiting or diarrhea
  • Lethargy or unwillingness to move
  • Lack of coordination
  • Unconsciousness

What to do if a dog is suffering from heatstroke

  • Move the animal to shade or a cooler environment
  • Provide cool, fresh drinking water
  • Cool the dog down with water or covered ice packs on the belly only
  • Do not force-feed water if the pet cannot drink freely on its own
  • Do not submerge the pet, this may cause further harm when temperature regulation is impaired
  • Do not cover, crate, or otherwise confine the pet
  • Even if your dog is responding well to cooling treatments, it is imperative that you contact (and go to) an emergency veterinarian

 

Handler and military working dog stand before MWD memorial on Guam.
“25 Marine War Dogs gave their lives liberating Guam in 1944. They served as sentries, messengers, and scouts. They explored caves, and detected mines and booby traps.” U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class John F. Looney [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Emails, Facebook posts, and retail store signs exclaim, “Happy Memorial Day!” At each one, I bristle and my mind travels back to a 1983 conversation with Moshe, a 15-year-old Israeli exchange student.

Moshe’s stay in the U.S. included the Memorial Day weekend, and he passionately spoke out against the celebratory atmosphere. “This is wrong,” he said. “Memorial Day isn’t about partying and shopping. It’s about remembering the sacrifice of those who gave their lives to protect our freedoms. It is supposed to be a solemn occasion. You don’t say, ‘Happy Memorial Day.’ You say, ‘Thank you.’”

Moshe’s words continue to resonate with me today. Ads announcing big Memorial Day blowout sales compete with media coverage of commemorative activities and veterans’ stories. Low-price promises and beer fests distract us from the meaning and intent of the day.

We, the volunteers of MWDTSA, encourage you to take time this weekend to reflect on the sacrifices of our nation’s two- and four-legged heroes. Visit a cemetery, study the grave markers, and place flags or flowers to say thank you. Watch a documentary, begin a biography, or read news articles about a fallen service member.

MWDTSA thanks handlers and MWDs, past and present, for your dedication to preserving our nation’s freedoms and protecting the United States of America. We feel enormous gratitude for your service.

This photo shows the Soda Pup "Heart on a String" rope toy, along with the front and back of a card we enclosed in each care package describing the collaboration with Dita the Hairmissile Dog. It takes a village to fill each care package.

We often say, “It takes a village” to fill our quarterly care packages. Four times a year, we send out approximately 200 large USPS Flat-Rate boxes, and we aim to fill them completely. Many thanks to the following Q1-2019 corporate donors…

Scout Troop 171 in Boulder, Colorado periodically sells coffee to raise money for backpacking trips and Scout camps. This year, they added an option for non-coffee drinkers—the opportunity to donate coffee for MWDTSA care packages.

Creative collaboration

This photo shows the three coffee blends MWDTSA included in Q1-2019 care packages.Sticks Coffee in Superior, Colorado also hosted a coffee fundraiser. As patrons streamed in from hockey tournaments, the cashiers asked, “Would you like to add a $10 donation to your purchase today to send coffee to a deployed military working dog handler?” Signs on the doors and at the register invited customers to take part in the drive.

Meanwhile, 822 miles away, Coffee.org of Fort Smith, Arkansas offered a stunning bulk purchase discount. This allowed donor dollars to stretch further to cover 100 percent of MWDTSA’s Q1-2019 coffee needs. We sent three small bags of coffee in each Q1 box, including a special blend that Coffee.org formulated specifically for MWDTSA. The label featured our “You and me” Q1 logo and the words “Reveille Blend: Just like the bugle, this coffee will wake you up!”

A neighborhood effort

This photo shows packets of Smokehouse Jerky Company Gourmet Brisket Beef Jerky.A post to the Oh-Oh-Two-Seven Facebook page, which serves zip codes 80027 and 80026, brought forth additional offers of help. Louisville Realty Associates (LRA) asked about our greatest Q1 needs. We had not yet secured Q1 jerky donations for handlers or dogs, so they took on that activity.

The same week LRA stepped forward, Smokehouse Jerky of California offered another generous bulk purchase discount. LRA, Nickerson Marketing, and Deep End Solutions pooled resources to fund the jerky purchase for handlers. Additionally, LRA made a personal introduction to a friend at Buckley Pet, a local dog treat manufacturer. Buckley Pet donated 200 bags of Skin & Coat Beef Jerky, enough to send one in every care package.

For the handlers…

This handsome FIFTY/FIFTY 20-ounce tumbler displays the Truckers for Troops logo.OOIDA (Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association) of Grain Valley, Missouri sponsors a “Truckers for Troops” fundraiser each year. Taking advantage of a generous discount from FIFTY/FIFTY, OOIDA purchased 200 coffee tumblers for our Q1-2019 boxes.

We stuffed these 20-ounce tumblers to the brim with donations from Juanita’s Pepitas, Perfetti Van Melle, Phillips Pet Food & Supplies, Picky Bars, Sweetwood Smokehouse, and VerMints.

Other handler surprises included dried apricots from Mariani Packing Company; Blue Diamond Smokehouse Almonds; Honey Stinger waffles; Cocomels from JJ’s Sweets, Inc.; cooling wipes from Duke Cannon; and magazines from 5280.

Each handler also received a t-shirt emblazed with “You and me, Malintine,” in honor of Valentine’s Day. We are grateful to Christian Print Shop, Inc. of Alpharetta, Georgia for their long-term support of MWDTSA with high-quality t-shirts. And to the five Kohl’s employees from the Louisville, Colorado store, who folded all 200 t-shirts into plastic bags with size labels!

The students of Jefferson Academy in Broomfield, Colorado created art to include in the care packages. This school has supported MWDTSA with art three times—Q4-2016, Q4-2017, and Q1-2019.

For the four-legged troops…

Woobamboo donated Large-Breed toothbrushes for the second year in a row.

A Petco Foundation grant, coupled with bulk purchase pricing from Prima Pets, enabled us to send a sturdy collapsible dog bowl in each care package.

Rex Specs hosted a donation drive in December to collect protective eyewear for our military working dog teams.

“Dita’s Donation Drop,” sponsored by Dita The Hairmissile, plus a matching program by SodaPup, yielded 200 Heart-on-a-String toys for our Q1-2019 boxes. And yes, these dogs do have our human hearts on a string.

Thanks to the annual KONGs for K9s drive, we included the KONG Extreme Tire in each care package. Numerous retailers and veterinary clinics help with this drive each year—including three that contributed to Q1-2019 care packages in other ways. Action-Packed Pup collected both tires and undercoat rakes. Kriser’s Natural Pet in Westminster, Colorado invited us to do an in-store event to collect tires and dog jerky.

A special shout-out to Chuck and Don’s Pet Food & Supplies (Longmont, Erie, and Arvada, Colorado). The Longmont store has hosted MWDTSA for in-store fundraising events for 30 straight months. They have taken part in the KONGs for K9s drive for three years. They have led our quarterly care package assembly twice. The managers of the Erie and Arvada stores, along with an Arvada team member, spearheaded our Q1-2019 packing event.

And last but not least…

Hats off to the Louisville (CO) Police Department for hosting our 2019 packing event and allowing us to make a temporary mess in the basement of the police station. We are grateful for your hospitality—two years in a row.

And to the United States Postal Service in Louisville, Colorado for spending a Sunday with us for the second year in a row. It was amazing to have you at the end of our packing line, and you worked tirelessly to get the boxes to the Post Office on a cold night, well after sunset.

Many thanks to all who made the Q1-2019 care packages possible, including a multitude of Amazon Wish List donors. UPS Store 1905 graciously received the many Amazon boxes and manufacturer donations, holding packages for us until we could pick them up. Nashville Wraps provided bags and ribbon for packaging donated candy.

Your contributions allow us to support both ends of the leash, and we are grateful.

Interested in helping with future care packages? Here are 14 ways to get involved, including a link to our Amazon Wish List. Or reach out to president@MWDTSA.org.

 

This photo shows care packages items sent in Q1-2019 to support military working dog teams.

If you, a group, or your company would like to support military working dog teams, here are several ways to get involved. Pick something from the following list, or use these ideas as inspiration for a new endeavor. It takes a village to fill our quarterly care packages. We invite you to join us in supporting both ends of the leash.

1) Donate 200 of an item.

We try to make each quarter’s care packages relatively uniform, so that all recipients are getting the same dog toys, snacks, etc. This means we need 200 of any item we’re planning to send. Every quarter, we aim to include made-in-USA jerky, dog treats, human snacks, grooming products, and other supplies. If your company makes a product you think handlers or their dogs might like, let’s talk! If you are able to provide the full quantity of an item, we add you to our sponsor page (https://www.mwdtsa.org/sponsors/). We also highlight your involvement via our social media channels.

2) Provide a bulk-purchase discount.

If you are not able to outright donate 200 of a particular product, consider offering a bulk purchase discount. If MWDTSA can buy your product below wholesale cost, the difference between your discounted and wholesale price is tax-deductible. We provide a donor acknowledgement letter for your tax records.

3) Offer a matching program.

Customers buy one, and you throw in a second—so we end up with two care package items for the price of one.

4) Team together to sponsor a care package item.

Maybe you’re a real estate company or high-tech firm that doesn’t manufacture products, but you’d still like to help fill care packages. MWDTSA can match you with a bulk-purchase discount, enabling your organization’s donation dollars to have more purchase power.

5) Plan a fundraiser.

In the past, volunteers have coordinated golf tournaments, 5Ks, nail trimming events, Chick-fil-A fundraising nights, and other creative activities—all to raise money for MWDTSA care packages. Destination Imagination teams, Scout troops, Bar/Bat Mitzvah candidates, coffee shops, breweries, and others looking for a service opportunity can make a big impact for MWDTSA.

6) Host a toy/treat drive.

If you own a retail store, veterinary clinic, or grooming salon, you can order in one of our wish-list products, place it at the register, and ask clients, “Would you like to add a treat for a military working dog to your purchase today? We’re collecting care package items for dogs deployed in global combat zones.” Customers leave their donation with you, and at the end of the drive, MWDTSA makes arrangements to get the donated products to our packing location.

7) Make an introduction.

Maybe your neighbor’s company produces an amazing snack item. We can equip you to approach your friend with a donation request. Your personal introduction can pave the way for important new partnerships and collaborations.

8) Add MWDTSA as an option on your order form.

If your kids are selling coffee or candy to raise money for their school or sports teams, they probably encounter the word “no” quite a bit. What if they could add this to their spiel: “If you are not a coffee consumer, you can also support our school/team by purchasing coffee to donate to a deployed military working dog handler.”

9) Adopt a care package.

Each care package involves approximately $150 in products and postage. Manufacturers donate many of the items we include. However, every quarter, we need assistance to cover t-shirts, tactical patches, postage, and other items. You can “adopt” a package by making a $75 donation via PayPal to fill these needs. This option includes the following benefits for donors:

  1. We will include a card in the care package, acknowledging who sponsored the box.
  2. You can dedicate the box. For example, “We are sending this care package in honor of Joe Sample, who served in World War II.”

This is a fun option for a Scout troop, school group, company, or family that wants to support military working dog teams. For more information, contact president@mwdtsa.org.

10) Collect children’s art.

A colorful painting of a dog provides cheer for handlers. Each quarter, we need at least 200 pieces of children’s art. Contact president@mwdtsa.org for criteria regarding size, subject matter, and medium.

11) Write letters of encouragement.

No one knows about deployments better than veterans who have served in global combat zones. Think back to your time overseas. Are there funny stories you can share? Advice you wish you had known earlier? Poems that boosted your morale? We’re looking for veterans groups who would like to write letters so that every care package we send has a personal communication in it.

12) Join Amazon Smile.

If you regularly shop on Amazon for your business or home, Amazon Smile donates a portion of your purchase price to the nonprofit of your choice. Choose Military Working Dog Team Support Association, and every purchase you make will help support military working dog teams.

13) Visit our Amazon Wish List.

Each quarter, and for special occasions such as National K9 Veterans Day, we maintain a registry of products we plan to include in upcoming care packages. You simply purchase one or more items, and Amazon sends them directly to our packing coordinator. Each wish list donation is tax deductible.

14) Donate through PayPal.

To send one care package requires nearly $18 in postage, and we send about 200 boxes per quarter. Some individuals and businesses contribute dollars to cover the postage bill.

Thank you for helping us support both ends of the leash!

Photo credit: Alex Sierra, Kohl’s, Louisville, CO captured this image of MWDTSA’s Q1-2019 care package contents. Alex and four colleagues from Kohl’s helped with pre-packing activities such as folding 200 t-shirts and inserting them in plastic sleeves.

 

Military working dog wearing Rex Specs sits beside Q1-2019 care package contents.

MWDTSA formally acknowledged Valentine’s Day with its Q1-2019 care packages. It’s been over 10 years since we’ve featured hearts and romance in our boxes. While “romance” might be too strong a word, we set out to honor the timeless bond between handler and dog. It’s a special kind of love worth celebrating.

We fiddled with a few different ideas. Shep-heart. Love-rador. But we decided “You and me, Malintine” has a ring to it. Knowing that some handlers’ partners are not Malinois, we stopped at “You and me” for the tactical patches.

Pictures are starting to roll in, and this is one of our favorite so far! :-)

p.s. If you’d like to contribute to Q2 care packages, visit MWDTSA’s Amazon wish list or our web site. Thanks for helping us support both ends of the leash.